BOX OFFICE: 601-948-3533
 

Oh, Mr. Faulkner, Do You Write?

Faulkner graphic

A very special virtual event!!

October 23, 2020 @ 7 p.m.

October 24, 2020 @ 7 p.m.

October 25, 2020 @ 2 p.m.

All tickets $15 with proceeds benefiting New Stage Theatre

For tickets: Click the Buy Tickets link above or click: https://www.newstagetheatre.com/tickets or call 601-948-3533

This will be a live streamed event only offered on the dates and times listed above. Upon online purchase, you will receive an immediate email confirmation and then you will receive an email with the LINK to the live stream by the next day. Purchases made on the day of the event will receive a link by 5 p.m. October 23 and 24 and by 12 p.m. October 25. All purchases must be made by 4:30 p.m. on October 23 and 24 and by 11:30 a.m. October 25.

Audiences in Mississippi will have a unique opportunity to help celebrate the 40th anniversary of Oh, Mr. Faulkner, Do You Write? and the 55th Anniversary of New Stage Theatre. John Maxwell has presented this internationally acclaimed one-man play on the life of Nobel Prize winning author to audiences all over the world, as well as most of the continental United States.

After presenting the one-man play over a 1,000 times, Maxwell never tires of it. “Oh, there are times when I wonder why i ever chose to do this for a living. But every time I step out on the stage, I have a renewed reverence for the man.” Most of the words in the show are pure Faulkner. “Tom Dupree (co-author) and I just took the letters, interviews, and stories and molded them into a play. But the humor and the pathos are straight out of Mr. Faulkner’s life. What most people don’t know about him is his wonderfully dry and dark sense of humor. He loved to tell stories, and was terrific at it. It is not meant as an academic thesis on the works. It’s about his life and about the stories in his life. We pay scant attention to the actual works themselves.”

However, as is the case with every writer, of course, his life reflects his works. The play concludes with Faulkner presenting his Nobel Prize acceptance speech. “It’s pure poetry,” said Maxwell. “If you’ve ever done Shakespeare, that’s the only thing I can possibly compare it to. It’s as pure, and as beautiful as anything either of the Williams ever wrote.”